Aug 17, 2022  
2015-2016 Catalog 
    
2015-2016 Catalog [PAST CATALOG]

College Policies and Procedures



Academic Integrity Policy

Anne Arundel Community College, with a central mission of producing learning and a belief that individuals be given the opportunity to fully develop their potential, is committed to upholding rigorous and fair standards of student learning and achievement. Achieving successful student learning is dependent upon a dedication to academic integrity on the part of all members of the college community. Without academic integrity, students gain unfair advantage over others and impede their own development. In support of this aim, Anne Arundel Community College requires all students to exhibit academic integrity in all their academic work.

A culture of academic integrity, a unifying principle in this and all academic communities, is built upon respect for others’ work, commitment to doing one’s own work, and intolerance for academic dishonesty in all its forms.

Acts of academic dishonesty include, but are not limited to:

  1. Cheating, which is the use or attempted use of unauthorized material, information, electronic device, implement or study aid in an academic exercise or assignment without the instructor’s permission;
  2. Plagiarizing, which is the unacknowledged or improperly cited adoption or reproduction of the ideas, words, data or statements of others, including fellow students and internet sources;
  3. Fabricating or falsifying, which is the unauthorized falsification or invention of any data, information or citation in an academic exercise;
  4. Impersonating, which is assuming another student’s identity or allowing another student to do so for the purpose of fulfilling an academic requirement;
  5. Facilitating, which is helping or attempting to help another commit an act of academic dishonesty.

The Board of Trustees hereby authorizes the President, or his/her designee, to develop and establish appropriate procedures to implement and enforce this policy. Anne Arundel Community College periodically reviews and updates its policies and procedures.

The procedures for investigative adjudication and resolution of an alleged academic dishonesty can be found on the Student Policy page.

Acceptable Use of Information Technology Resources

Anne Arundel Community College provides an array of information technology resources (including, but not limited to, all computer hardware, software, peripherals, and mobile devices; network communications technologies, including wireless technologies; network and internet bandwidth; telephone and voicemail; and electronic services and information) in order to facilitate the pursuit of excellence in support of the college’s mission. Usage of information technology resources is provided at the discretion of the college, for the sole purpose of conducting official college business.

It is the policy of Anne Arundel Community College that all users (including, but not limited to, faculty, staff, students, contractors, and guests) of information technology resources shall:

  • comply with all laws (federal, state, local, and other applicable laws and regulations) and all college policies;
  • respect the privacy and personal rights of others;
  • respect the integrity and security of college information technology resources;
  • respect the finite capacity of college information technology resources so as not to interfere unreasonably with the activity of other users;
  • use information technology resources for college business only;
  • respect the intellectual property rights of others; and
  • protect all confidential information.

The Board of Trustees hereby authorizes the President, or his/her designee, to develop and establish appropriate standards and procedures to implement and enforce this policy, including processes for detecting and addressing violations of this policy.

Procedures Governing Use of Information Technology

These procedures are enacted pursuant to the Acceptable Use of Information Technology Resources Policy. They shall govern all use of Information Technology Resources and apply to all users.

  1. Information technology resources shall include but not be limited to:
    1. All computer hardware, software, peripherals and mobile devices
    2. Network communications technologies including wireless technologies
    3. Network and Internet bandwidth
    4. Telephone and voicemail
    5. Electronic services and information
  2. Information technology resources are owned by and are the property of the college. All users must be authorized by the college to access information technology resources. Such access shall be at the discretion of the college. Anything created at the direction of the college using information technology resources shall be the property of the college.
  3. Any user of information technology resources shall:
    1. Comply with all laws (federal, state, local and other applicable laws and regulations); and all College policies and procedures.
    2. Respect the privacy and personal rights of others so as not to constitute an invasion of privacy, harassment, defamation, threat, intimidation, unwarranted annoyance, embarrassment, discrimination based on race, color, age, religion, sex, national origin, marital status, sexual orientation, ability, genetic information and veteran status, or the like.
    3. Respect the integrity and security of information technology resources by not attempting to circumvent the system security and/or aid others to achieve unauthorized access including, but not limited to, sharing a user password.
    4. Respect the finite capacity of information technology resources so as not to interfere unreasonably with the activity of other users.
    5. Use information technology resources for authorized college-related purposes only.
    6. Respect and honor the intellectual property rights of others whether protected by patent, copyright, trademark, trade secrets law, other legal mechanism and/or the college Intellectual Property Policy and Procedures.
    7. Only access confidential information when authorized by the college. Any confidential information obtained by an authorized user shall only be used for the appropriate college purpose for which access was authorized. Confidential information shall only be stored on college authorized services or devices.
    8. Report any discovered weakness in the Information Technology Resources security system to the Chief Technology Officer.
    9. Report any incident of misuse of any information technology resource or violation of these Procedures to the Chief Technology Officer.
    10. Report any damaged, lost or stolen technology resource, including personal devices that may have college confidential information thereon, to the Chief Technology Officer.
    11. Only use college-owned information technology resources to connect to the internally wired college network unless Customer Support Services reviews and approves other equipment connections in advance.
  4. The college has the right, at all time, to monitor its information technology resources. Authorized Information Services personnel may inspect files and/or monitor a user’s usage of resources, if the college suspects a violation of these procedures, other college policies or procedures, or the law. In response to the Higher Education Opportunity Act the college employs a commercial tool which identifies and blocks peer-to-peer applications running on the network.
  5. Violations of these Procedures shall be dealt with as follows:
    1. All detected or reported violations shall be investigated by the Information Services staff. They shall promptly collect all relevant documents and information relating to the alleged violation. An incident report shall be prepared in all cases of detected or reported procedure violations. Upon collection and review of all relevant information and documentation, a determination shall be made as to whether a violation occurred. If it is determined that no violation occurred it shall be so stated in the incident report and the matter shall be closed. If a violation is found to have occurred, it shall be so stated in the incident report and reference shall be made to the supporting information and/or documentation.
    2. Sanctions for violation of these procedures may include, but are not limited to, revocation of user account privileges, confiscation of files, data and equipment, and removal of computers from the network. Based on the circumstances, at the discretion of the college, any or all of these sanctions may be imposed prior to the conclusion of the investigation. In addition to the aforementioned sanctions, an incident report finding that a faculty, staff, or student committed a violation of these procedures may result in a referral to the appropriate college department for further action under applicable college policies and procedures relating to the violator. In any case where a violation of law occurred, the matter may be referred to the appropriate law enforcement agency.

Americans with Disabilities Act Policy

Upon request, Anne Arundel Community College will provide reasonable accommodations to all qualified individuals with disabilities.

Eligibility for use of Disability Support Services (DSS) will be established by a DSS adviser. A letter from a physician, psychologist or other licensed professional clinician certified in the field of disability may be required to validate the student’s disability.

Students wishing to use any college service provided to students with disabilities should present written verification to DSS, located in Counseling, Advising and Retention Services. Should the information not be comprehensive or if the documentation is inadequate, the Disability Verification Form will be returned to the student and/or sent to the physician or other certified professional clinician.

For specific procedures, see Disability Support Services .

For information regarding Anne Arundel Community College’s compliance and complaints concerning the Americans with Disabilities Act contact the Federal Compliance Office and Title IX Coordinator at complianceofficer@aacc.edu or by telephone 410-777-1239 or Maryland Relay at 7111.

Animals on Campus

Pets on a leash, controlled by a responsible person are permitted on campus but not allowed in any building, college vehicle, event facility such as the stadium, or at a scheduled campus event unless expressly invited. Service animals may accompany people with disabilities in all areas of college where the public is normally allowed. Service animals must be harnessed, leashed, or tethered, unless these devices interfere with the service animal’s work or the individual’s disability prevents using these devices. In accordance with US Department of Justice guidelines service animals are defined as dogs that are individually trained to do work or perform tasks for people with disabilities and miniature horses that have been individually trained.

Consensual Relationships Policy

Anne Arundel Community College is committed to providing and maintaining a working and learning environment free from conflicts of interest, exploitation, and/or favoritism. Consensual relationships where any evaluative and/or supervisory role exists create a conflict of interest and, therefore, a potential for exploitation and/or favoritism. A consensual relationship is any relationship willingly undertaken by both parties that is romantic and/or sexual in nature.

Anne Arundel Community College prohibits an individual from evaluating, supervising, or making any employment decision, whatsoever, regarding an individual with whom he or she has a consensual relationship. This policy also prohibits any individual from providing academic instruction to and/or assessing an individual with whom he or she has a consensual relationship.

Consensual relationships between faculty and adult students where no evaluative and/or supervisory role exists are strongly discouraged, and any consensual relationship with a student under the age of 18 is prohibited.

The Board of Trustees hereby authorizes the President, or his/her designee, to develop and establish appropriate procedures to implement and enforce this policy.

For information regarding Anne Arundel Community College’s compliance and complaints concerning consensual relationships contact the Federal Compliance officer and Title IX Coordinator at complianceofficer@aacc.edu or by telephone at 410 - 777-1239 or Maryland Relay at 7111.

Copyright Policy

The rights of the owner of copyrighted material shall be respected and not be infringed. Use of any copyrighted material for any purpose shall be in accordance with the law and with appropriate reference and citation to the creator and the material.

The Board of Trustees hereby authorizes the President, or his/her designee, to develop and establish appropriate procedures to implement and enforce this policy.

Drug and Alcohol Prohibitions Policy

Anne Arundel Community College is committed to providing a drug- and alcohol-free, safe and secure educational environment. The college complies with all local, state and federal laws related to drug and alcohol use. Employees, contractors, business invitees, visitors and students shall be free from the possession, distribution, use or influence of illegal drugs or alcohol when on college property or when attending a college activity or when representing the college off campus. An exception for alcohol use may be made when such use is approved for a college-sanctioned event.

The Board of Trustees hereby authorizes the President, or his/her designee, to maintain and keep current an educational program in support of this policy and to develop and establish appropriate procedures to implement and enforce this policy.

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination Policy

Anne Arundel Community College is committed to providing and maintaining equal opportunity in its educational programs, services, employment and all other activities conducted by or with the college.

Anne Arundel Community College prohibits discrimination or harassment based on race, color, age, religion, sex, national origin, marital status, sexual orientation, disability, genetic information and veteran status. This policy applies to all members of, and entities within, the college and all individuals, companies and organizations which conduct business with the college.

The President, or his/her designee, shall, and is hereby authorized to, develop, implement, maintain, and keep current an educational and informational program consistent with this policy. The Board of Trustees hereby authorizes the President, or his/her designee, to develop and establish appropriate procedures to implement and enforce this policy.

For information regarding Anne Arundel Community College’s compliance and complaints concerning discrimination contact the Federal Compliance officer and Title IX Coordinator at complianceofficer@aacc.edu or by telephone at 410 - 777-1239 or Maryland Relay at 7111.

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) of 1974, as amended, is a federal law which concerns the confidentiality of student education records.

AACC Policy

The policy of the college is to protect and distribute a student’s educational records, including, but not limited to, any personally identifiable information, in accordance with the federal Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act.

The Board of Trustees hereby authorizes the President, or his/her designee, to develop and establish appropriate procedures to implement and enforce this policy.

Family Education Rights and Privacy Procedures

Anne Arundel Community College, hereinafter called “the college,” accords all rights under the law to its students, past and present. No one outside the institution shall have access to, nor will the institution disclose, any personally identifiable information from students’ education records without the written consent of the student. Exceptions to this are: personnel within the institution who have “need to know” for education reasons; officials of other institutions in which the student seeks to enroll; persons or organizations providing students with financial aid; accrediting agencies carrying out their accreditation function; persons in compliance with a judicial order; and persons who, in an emergency, need to know in order to protect the health or safety of students or other persons. All these exceptions are permitted under the act.

Within the college community, only those members, individually or collectively, acting in the students’ educational interest are allowed access to student education records. These members include personnel in the Admissions and Enrollment Development office, Records and Registration office, the vice presidents’ offices, Office of the President and selected personnel within the limitations of their “need to know.” At his/her discretion, the registrar may provide directory information in accordance with the provisions of the act to include: student name, address, telephone number, MyAACC email address, date and place of birth, major field of study, dates of attendance, student ID, part-time and full-time status, degrees and awards received, the most recent educational agency or institution attended by the student, participation in officially recognized activities or sports, and weight and height of members of athletic teams. The college will generally release only the student’s name, dates of attendance and degrees and honors earned as directory information.

Students may withhold directory information by notifying the registrar, in writing, within one (1) month after the first day of the term. Requests for nondisclosure of directory information will be honored by the college for the current academic year only; therefore, renewed requests for nondisclosure must be filed with the registrar at the beginning of each term in order to remain in effect.

The law provides students with the right to inspect and review information contained in their education records, to challenge the contents of their education records, to have a hearing if the outcome of their challenge is unsatisfactory to them and to submit explanatory statements for inclusion in their files if they feel the decisions of the hearing panel to be unacceptable. The registrar of the college has been designated by the college to coordinate the inspection and review procedures for student education records, which include admissions, academic, financial and financial aid files, and academic, cooperative education and placement records. Education records do not include the following: records of instructional, administrative and educational personnel, which are the sole possession of the maker and are not accessible or revealed to any individuals except a temporary substitute; records of alumni; and records of student health. Health records may be reviewed by physicians of the student’s choosing. Students MAY NOT inspect and review the following as outlined by the act: financial information submitted by their parents; confidential letters and recommendations associated with admissions, employment or job placement, or honors to which they have waived the rights of inspection and review; education records containing information about more than one student, in which case the college will permit access to ONLY that part of the record which pertains to the inquiring student. The college is not required to permit students to inspect and review confidential letters and recommendations placed in their files prior to Jan. 1, 1975, provided those letters were collected under established policies of confidentiality and were used only for the purposes for which they were collected.

Any student wishing to review his/her education records must make a written request to the registrar listing the item or items of interest. Only records covered by the act will be made available within forty-five (45) days of the request. A student may have copies made of his/her records with certain exceptions (e.g. a copy of the academic record for which a financial “hold” exists or a transcript of an original or source document which exists elsewhere).

A student who believes that his/her education records contain information that is inaccurate or misleading, or is otherwise in violation of his/her privacy or other rights, may discuss the problem informally with the registrar. If the decision is in agreement with the student’s request, the appropriate record will be amended. If not, the student will be notified within a reasonable period of time that the records will not be amended; he/she will be informed by the registrar of his/her right to a formal hearing. Student requests for a formal hearing must be made, in writing, to the vice president for learning who, within a reasonable period of time after receiving such requests, will inform the student of the date, place and time of the hearing. The student may present evidence relevant to the issues raised and may be assisted or represented at the hearing by one or more persons of his/her choosing, including attorneys, at the student’s expense. The hearing panel, which will adjudicate such challenges, will be composed of the following three people: vice president for learning; vice president for learning resources management; and director of admissions and enrollment development. The registrar, as consultant to the panel, will be present during the presentation of all evidence and arguments; he/she will not participate in the voting of the panel.

Decisions of the hearing panel will be based solely on the evidence presented at the hearing. They will consist of written statements summarizing the evidence and giving the reasons for the decisions; copies of the document will be delivered to all parties concerned. If the decisions are unsatisfactory to the student, the student may place statements with the education records commenting on the information in the records or statements setting forth any reasons for disagreeing with the decisions of the hearing panel.

The statements will be placed in the education records,  maintained as part of the student’s records and released whenever the records in question are disclosed.

Any student who believes the adjudication of his/her challenge was unfair, or not in keeping with the provisions of the act, may request, in writing, assistance from the president of the college, who may direct the panel to review its decisions. Further, any student who believes his/her rights have been abridged may file complaints with the Family Policy and Compliance Office, U.S. Department of Education, Washington, D.C. 20202-4605, concerning the alleged failures of the college to comply with the act.

Revisions and clarifications will be published as experience with the law and institutional policy warrant.

Fund Raising/Solicitation Policy

In accordance with the college manual, solicitation on campus by individual students or groups is restricted to college-approved fundraisers. Individual students and campus organizations are prohibited from making appeals to the outside public for gifts or contributions except by special permission. To obtain permission for either on- or off-campus solicitations, submit a Fund-Raiser Application form to the Student Life office, which will forward a copy to the Development office.

Intellectual Property Policy

Anne Arundel Community College encourages faculty and other employees to undertake different forms of creative work and to add new scholarship and creations to the body of public knowledge, some of which may be protected by copyright, patent, trademark, trade secrets, and/or other laws. To eliminate conflict, it is appropriate to establish ownership, rights, and responsibilities with respect to intellectual property created, developed, or produced by faculty and other employees during their employment at the college.

The creator of intellectual property shall be the owner of the property unless:

  • the creator is commissioned by the college to create the property, in which event the college shall own the property;
  • certain college resources are used in the creation, development, or production of the property, in which event the college shall own the property;
  • the creation, development, or production of the property is funded through the college by gifts or grants, in which event the college shall own the property. Any revenues received from the licensing of an invention, funded by a Federal grant, shall be distributed pursuant to an agreement with the inventor in accordance with Federal law;
  • a written agreement exists between the creator and the college establishing the ownership of the property.

The Board of Trustees hereby authorizes the President, or his/her designee, to develop and establish appropriate procedures to implement and enforce this policy.

Nepotism Policy

Anne Arundel Community College is committed to providing and maintaining a working and learning environment in which every individual is evaluated on the merits of his or her performance without favoritism. Nepotism is favoritism or the appearance of favoritism by a person in an evaluative or supervisory position to a relative or to any person living in the immediate household of the employee. A relative is one connected to another by blood, adoption or marriage.

Anne Arundel Community College prohibits an individual from evaluating, supervising, or making any employment decision, whatsoever, regarding a relative or any person living in the immediate household of the employee. This policy also prohibits any individual from providing academic instruction to or assessing the academic performance of a relative or any person living in the immediate household of the employee.

The Board of Trustees hereby authorizes the President, or his/her designee, to develop and establish appropriate procedures to implement and enforce this policy.

For information regarding Anne Arundel Community College’s compliance and complaints concerning nepotism contact the Federal Compliance officer and Title IX Coordinator at complianceofficer@aacc.edu or by telephone at 410 - 777-1239 or Maryland Relay at 7111.

Off-Campus Events

Students participating in college-sponsored classes, events, programs and activities that are off-campus must adhere to the same guidelines and policies as on-campus events.

Policy Statement on Sex Offenders

Anne Arundel Community College practices an open door admission policy. Students are admitted to the college without regard to race, color, religion, gender, age, sexual orientation, national origin, disability or any other characteristic protected by law. However, some restrictions exist for applicants who are currently enrolled in high school, are under 16 years of age, or are not U.S. citizens. In addition, the college has a requirement that individuals who are listed on the national Sex Offender Registry or the Maryland Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services Sex Offender Registry register with the required local and state agencies and inform the college’s Department of Public Safety and the Office of the Dean of Student Services or his/her designee upon their enrollment.

Procedures for Implementation

  1. Each term prior to the individual enrolling for classes, he/she must document that he/she has registered with the appropriate local and state agencies as required by law and also register with the college’s Department of Public Safety and the Office of the Dean of Student Services or his/her designee.
  2. If the individual is properly registered with the county police and all other appropriate agencies, he/she shall be referred to the Office of the Dean of Student Services or his/her designee.
  3. No later than seven days from the referral, the Dean of Student Services or his/her designee shall contact the individual to review with him/her whether any restrictions or conditions for his/her release or parole exist which may impact the individual’s enrollment and are deemed relevant for the protection of the student population and the college.
  4. During the meeting with the Dean of Student Services or his/her designee, the individual will be required to present a current valid state photo ID. If course registration is permitted, the individual must also have a current AACC photo ID in the database.
  5. Based on the nature of the individual’s offense and the stipulations associated with his/her release, the Dean of Student Services or his/her designee shall establish a verbal contingency agreement for the student. The agreement may include, but is not limited to, the following conditions:
    1. Restrict the student from participation in certain programs, courses or events.
    2. Restrict the student’s access to certain areas of the college.
    3. Require the individual to provide documentation to the Dean of Student Services or his/her designee that he/she is participating in any required psychological or medical treatment programs.
    4. Any other appropriate terms deemed necessary by the Dean of Student Services or his/her designee to be included in the agreement.
  6. Any violation of any term of the agreement shall subject the individual to immediate suspension and/or termination from the college.

Posting Material on Campus

All posted material must bear a stamp from the Student Life office or include the college logo. Properly marked material may be displayed on any non-glass, non-painted surface within the college buildings.

Non-college materials may be posted in no more than five locations and must be stamped by the Student Life office with a destroy date after 45 days.

Posted materials may not exceed 40 inches in combined length and height and must follow the college non-discrimination policy and comply with college guidelines against harassment.

Fliers cannot be placed on car windshields anywhere on campus.

Residency Requirements for Tuition Purposes Policy

Students at Anne Arundel Community College are charged tuition according to their residence for tuition purposes and are classified as one of the following:

  • in-county residents (a resident of Anne Arundel County);
  • out-of-county, in-state residents, i.e., residents of other Maryland counties or Baltimore City; or
  • out-of-state residents (a resident of a state other than Maryland  or a foreign country).

Students have the responsibility to provide appropriate documentation to establish residency for tuition purposes.

Students shall be considered “in-county” or “out-of-county, in-state” residents of Maryland for tuition purposes if:

  • they maintain their legal domicile there for or a period of not less than three months before the starting date of the session for which they enroll;
    or
  • if another person or persons maintaining legal domicile in Maryland had contributed more than one-half of the student’s financial support during the most recent completed tax year; 
    or
  • they are receiving an Edward T. Conroy Memorial Scholarship from the Maryland Higher Education Commission.

Tuition for members of the United States Armed Forces, their spouses and dependent children:

  • Students who are members of the United States Armed Forces, regardless of domicile, duty station or residence, will be classified as “in-county” residents for tuition purposes;
  • Students who are a spouse or dependent child of a member of the United States Armed Forces who resides in Anne Arundel County will be classified as “in-county” residents for tuition purposes regardless of the length of residency;
  • Students who are the spouse or dependent child of a member of the United States Armed Forces who resides in Maryland, outside of Anne Arundel County, will be classified as “out of county, in state” residents for tuition purposes regardless of the length of residency;
  • Students who are the spouse or dependent child of a member of the United States Armed Forces whose domicile or duty station changes from an in-state location to a location outside of the state of Maryland will be classified as “out-of-county, in-state” residents for tuition purposes as long as they remain continuously enrolled;
  • Students who are honorable United State Armed Forces qualified veterans will be classified as “out-of-county, in-state” residents for tuition purposes, even if residing outside the state of Maryland;
  • Students who are receiving Montgomery or Post-9/11 GI Bill educational benefits who enroll within three years of discharge and their spouse or dependent children who enroll within three years of the qualified veteran’s (transferor’s) discharge will be classified as either “in county,” if a resident of Anne Arundel County, or “out-of-county, in-state,” even if residing outside the state of Maryland, for tuition purposes;
  • Students receiving a Fry Scholarship will be classified as either “in county” if a resident of Anne Arundel County or “out-of-county, in-state,” even if residing outside the state of Maryland, for tuition purposes.

Students who are Anne Arundel County public school teachers who enroll in a course required for employment are classified as “in-county resident” for tuition purposes even if residing outside of Anne Arundel County.

The Board of Trustees hereby authorizes the president, or his/her designee, to develop and establish appropriate procedures to implement and enforce this policy.

Responsible Email Account Usage Guidelines

Use of Anne Arundel Community College sponsored email is a privilege provided to each student. The purpose of the service is to support learning and teaching and college business. The following guidelines are set forth to assure email use is consistent with this purpose and is legal, respectful, responsible and within the standards established by the college. Violation of the standards set forth may result in immediate loss of email privileges and disciplinary action as outlined in the “Student Conduct Policy.”

  • The privacy of others must be respected at all times.
  • Email sent with the intent of disrupting communication or other system services is not allowed. The proliferation of certain electronic mail, such as chain letters, is abusive to the electronic mail system and network, and is not allowed.
  • Willful misrepresentation of yourself in any electronic communication is not allowed.
  • Threats or harassment on the basis of race, ethnicity, gender, disability, religion, sexual orientation or age (including harassment in terms of using a stereotyped group characteristic) are prohibited. Harassment is any verbal or physical conduct, on or off campus, which has the intent or effect of unreasonably interfering with an individual’s or group’s learning or work performance or which creates an intimidating, hostile or offensive learning or work environment.
  • Do not purposely attempt to break into or use another person’s account.
  • Exclusive rights of a copyright owner shall not be infringed upon.

Sexual Harassment and Sexual Misconduct Policy

Anne Arundel Community College is committed to providing programs, activities and an educational environment in which all individuals are valued, respected and secure. Therefore, all forms of sex discrimination, sexual harassment and sexual misconduct, including, but not limited to, non-consensual sexual acts,  dating violence, domestic violence, and stalking are expressly prohibited. Retaliation for reporting any such conduct is also expressly prohibited. This policy applies to all Anne Arundel Community College students, faculty, administrators, staff, volunteers, vendors and others conducting business on behalf of the college, regardless of sexual orientation or gender identity or expression.

All members of the college community share in the responsibility to create and maintain a safe learning environment. Employees who have been or are being subjected to sex discrimination, sexual harassment or sexual misconduct or who are aware of another who has been or is being subjected to sex discrimination, sexual harassment or sexual misconduct shall immediately notify the college Federal Compliance Officer so appropriate action can be taken.  Students who have been or are being subjected to sex discrimination, sexual harassment or sexual misconduct or who are aware of another who has been or is being subjected to sex discrimination, sexual harassment or sexual misconduct are strongly encouraged to notify the college Federal Compliance Officer, college Department of Public Safety and Police, or other appropriate college authorities or local law enforcement.

The Board of Trustees hereby authorizes the president, or his/her designee, to develop and establish appropriate procedures to implement and enforce this policy and to develop, implement, maintain, and keep current an educational, informational, and compliance program consistent with this policy.

For information regarding Anne Arundel Community College’s compliance and complaints concerning sexual harassment contact the Federal Compliance officer and Title IX Coordinator at complianceofficer@aacc.edu or by telephone at 410 - 777-1239 or Maryland Relay at 7111.

Student Athlete Eligibility

In order to be eligible to participate in intercollegiate athletics, a student shall meet the minimum requirements of the National Junior College Athletic Association as written in the NJCAA Handbook & Casebook.

In addition to the National Junior College Athletic Association requirements, a first-year participant shall receive a minimum 1.75 adjusted grade point average, which omits repeated, forgiven and developmental courses. A second-year participant shall achieve a minimum 2.00 adjusted grade point average, which omits repeated, forgiven and developmental courses. Participants must comply with all college policies, particularly regarding demonstration of residency for tuition purposes. To establish and maintain eligibility, participants must pay all tuition and fees by the scheduled due date.

Eligibility for all transfer students who wish to participate in intercollegiate athletics will be assessed based upon the transcripts from their most recently attended postsecondary institution where they attained full-time status (attempting 12 credits or more). They shall comply with the standards enumerated previously, according to their years of participation at the collegiate level with regards to the specific sport. At the point a student-athlete has established a grade point average at Anne Arundel Community College, then eligibility will be assessed based upon his/her achievement at Anne Arundel Community College.

Student Complaint Procedures

Students seeking to resolve a concern or complaint about or an issue relevant to an action or inaction of a college employee should use the following procedures. These procedures are established to resolve the matter fairly and in a timely manner. Therefore, whenever possible, consultation with those individuals directly involved is encouraged. Resolution may be facilitated by a college ombudsperson who can assist both parties with his or her attempt to articulate concerns and identify possible solutions. Please contact Counseling, Advising and Retention Services to inquire about ombudsperson services.

  1. GRIEVANCE ABOUT ACADEMIC ASSESSMENT
    1. The authority to assign grades for academic work is exclusive to the course instructor. Therefore, should a student believe that an assigned grade or evaluation rating is capricious or unfair, the student should immediately discuss the matter with the instructor.
    2. If the student believes that the concern has not been adequately addressed by the instructor, only then should the student seek the assistance of the department chair/ director/supervisor in an attempt to resolve this matter.
    3. If after five business days from initial contact of the department chair/director/supervisor the student believes that the concern has not been adequately addressed, only then should the student seek the assistance of the school/division dean.
    4. A response to the student’s written complaint will be prepared by the dean within five business days of receipt of a complaint. If the student believes that the dean’s response has not addressed the concern, only then should the student seek the assistance of the vice president for learning. The vice president should be contacted in writing. Correspondence with the vice president must include details of compliance with the process as outlined above.
    5. The written decision of the vice president or his/her designee(s) shall be final.
    6. Adjustment to the process: No step here outlined may be ignored; however, in the event that a student has valid reasons for declining discussion with the instructor or the chair, the student may write to the school/division dean detailing such reasons and requesting an exception to the process. This is the sole method for adjusting the grievance process about an academic assessment.
  2. GRIEVANCE ABOUT FACULTY MEMBERS AND INSTRUCTIONAL STAFF INTERACTIONS WITH A STUDENT
    1. Should a student have concern about the actions, inactions or comments of a faculty or instructional staff member, the student should immediately discuss the matter with the instructor or instructional staff member to try to resolve the matter.
    2. If the student believes that the concern has not been adequately addressed by the instructor or instructional staff member, only then should the student seek the assistance of the department chair/director/supervisor in an attempt to resolve this matter.
    3. If after five business days from initial contact of the department chair/director/supervisor the student believes that the concern has not been adequately addressed, only then should the student seek the assistance of the school/division dean.
    4. A response to the student’s written complaint will be prepared by the dean within five business days of receipt of a complaint. If the student believes that the dean’s response has not addressed the concern, only then should the student seek the assistance of the vice president for learning.
      The vice president should be contacted in writing. Correspondence with the vice president must include details of compliance with the process as outlined above.
    5. The written decision of the vice president or his/her designee(s) shall be final.
    6. Adjustment to the process: No step here outlined may be ignored; however, in the event that a student has valid reasons for declining discussion with the instructor, staff member or the chair/director/supervisor, the student may write to the school/division dean detailing such reasons and
      requesting an exception to the process. This is the sole method for adjusting the grievance process.
  3. STUDENT GRIEVANCE ABOUT COLLEGE STAFF INTERACTIONS WITH A STUDENT
    1. Should a student have concern about the actions, inactions or comments of a non-instructional staff member, the student should immediately discuss the matter with the staff member and try to resolve the matter.
    2. If the student believes that the concern has not been adequately addressed by the staff member, only then should the student seek the assistance of the department chair/director/supervisor in an attempt to resolve this matter.
    3. If after five business days from initial contact of the department chair/director/supervisor the student believes that the concern has not been adequately addressed, only then should the student seek the assistance of the school/division dean.
    4. A response to the student’s written complaint will be prepared by the dean within five business days of receipt of a complaint. If the student believes that the dean’s response has not addressed the concern, only then should the student seek the assistance of the responsible vice president. The vice president should be contacted in writing. Correspondence with the vice president must include details of compliance with the process as outlined above.
    5. The written decision of the vice president or his/her designee(s) shall be final.
    6. Adjustment to the process: No step here outlined may be ignored; however, in the event that a student has valid reasons for declining discussion with the staff member or the chair/director/supervisor, the student may write to the school/division dean detailing such reasons and requesting
      an exception to the process. This is the sole method for adjusting the grievance process.
  4. ACCUSATION OF DISCRIMINATION
    Questions concerning requests for accommodations should be directed to Counseling, Advising and Retention Services. Any complaints concerning requests for accommodations or of discrimination shall be directed to the federal compliance officer.

*Once a student has exhausted the above procedures, he or she may pursue state of Maryland consumer complaint procedures. See the consumer information section on the Anne Arundel Community College website, https://www.aacc.edu/aid/consumerinfo.cfm or contact the Maryland Higher Education Commission at 410-767-3301 or http://www.mhec.state.md.us/

Student Conduct Policy

Students shall at all times conduct themselves in a manner that demonstrates mutual respect and courtesy, displays appropriate standards of behavior, and refrains from any actions or inactions that impinge on the rights of others or disrupt the teaching and/or learning process or the operations of the college. A student found in violation of this policy or any other College policy shall be subject to appropriate sanctions in accordance with the student conduct procedures.

The Board of Trustees hereby authorizes the president, or his/her designee, to develop and establish appropriate procedures to implement and enforce this policy.

The procedures for conducting an investigation of an accusation of misconduct along with the standards for adjudication and sanctions can be found at https://www.aacc.edu/studentpolicies/file/codeofconduct15fall.pdf.

Student Rights and Responsibilities

Preamble

Academic institutions such as Anne Arundel Community College exist for the transmission of knowledge, the pursuit of truth, the development of students and the general well-being of society. Free inquiry and free expression are indispensable to the attainment of these goals. As members of this academic community, our students should be encouraged to develop the capacity for critical judgment and to engage in a sustained and independent search for truth. Procedures for achieving these purposes may vary from campus to campus, but the minimal standards of academic freedom of students outlined below are essential to any community of scholars.

Freedom to teach and freedom to learn are inseparable facets of academic freedom. The freedom to learn depends upon appropriate opportunities and conditions in the classroom, on the campus and in the larger community. Students should exercise their freedom with responsibility.

The responsibility to secure and respect general conditions conducive to the freedom to learn is shared by all members of the academic community. This college has a duty to develop policies and procedures which provide and safeguard this freedom. Such policies and procedures should be developed within the framework of general standards and with the broadest possible participation of the members of the academic community. The purpose of this statement is to enumerate the essential provisions for student freedom to learn.

  1. FREEDOM OF ACCESS TO HIGHER EDUCATION
    The admissions policy of each college is a matter of institutional choice provided that each college makes clear the characteristics and expectations of students which it considers relevant to success in the institution’s program. Under no circumstances will a student be barred from admission to Anne Arundel Community College on the basis of race, color, creed, sex, national origin, sexual orientation, religion or condition of physical handicap. Thus, within the limits of its facilities, Anne Arundel Community College is open to all students who are qualified according to its admissions standards. These standards and corollary requirements are specified in the college catalog. The facilities and services of this college are open to all of its enrolled students and this institution will use its influence to secure equal access for all students to public facilities in the local community.
  2. IN THE CLASSROOM
    The professor in the classroom and in conference is expected to encourage free discussion, inquiry and expression. Student performance will be evaluated solely on an academic basis, not on opinions or conduct in matters unrelated to academic standards.
    1. Freedom of Expression
      Students are free to take reasoned exception to the data or views offered in any course of study and to reserve judgment about matters of opinion, but they are responsible for learning the content of the course as these requirements are detailed by the instructor. “The teacher is entitled to
      freedom in the classroom in discussing his/her subject, but not to introduce into his/her teaching controversial matter which has no relation to his/her subject.” (AAUP: 1940 Statement of Principles.)
    2. Insuring Proper Academic Performance
      Students are responsible for meeting the established requirements and maintaining standards of academic performance established for those courses in which they are registered. The instructor’s evaluation of their performance in a particular course will be based upon appropriate and well-defined criteria. If a student questions the fairness or appropriateness of academic evaluation, he/she may talk with the instructor. If the problem is not resolved, the student has recourse to the department coordinator, department chair, dean and the vice president for learning. Students are referred to the college catalog for information on grade changes.
    3. Protection Against Improper Disclosure
      Information about student views, beliefs, academic evaluations and political associations which instructors acquire in the course of their professional work will be considered confidential. Judgments of ability and character will be considered a part of a student’s record and will be treated as such under the provisions of the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) procedures.
  3. STUDENT AFFAIRS
    1. Freedom of Association
      Students bring to the campus a variety of interests previously acquired and develop many new interests as members of the academic community. They have the right to organize and join associations and to promote their common interests and to meet cocurricular educational needs.
      1. Student organizations, in order to utilize college facilities for activities or to publicize activities on the campus, must receive official recognition by the Student Association and the college through the appropriate institutional officers and are required to keep a constitution on file with the recognizing authorities. This constitution must indicate the organization’s purposes, criteria for membership and rules and procedures.
      2. The membership, policies and actions of a student organization will be determined by vote of only those persons who hold bonafide membership in the organization in question and those charged with formally and officially recognizing that organization.
      3. No student organization will be denied institutional recognition or any of the benefits thereof SOLELY because of its affiliation with an extramural organization. However, if such organizations demonstrate by their activities that they are in conflict with institutional goals and standards acceptable in the community or if the organization engages in activities which are unlawful, the college may withhold financial support and recognition or may withdraw recognition with cause.
      4. Each organization has the right to select its own adviser and institutional recognition will not be withheld or withdrawn solely because an organization is unable to secure an adviser. Organizational advisers may advise organizations in the exercise of responsibility but do not have
        authority to control the policy of such organizations.
      5. Campus organizations, including those affiliated with an extramural organization, are open to all students without respect to race, color, sex, creed, national origin, sexual orientation, religion or condition of handicap, except for scholastic attainment criteria which may apply to honorary societies.
    2. Freedom of Inquiry and Expression
      1. Students and student organizations have the right to freely examine and discuss all questions of interest to them and to express opinions publicly and privately. They have the right to support causes by orderly means which do not disrupt the regular and essential operation
        of the institution. At the same time, it must be made clear to the academic and larger community that in their public expressions or demonstrations, students or student organizations may speak only for themselves, not for the institution.
      2. Students have the right to invite to the campus and hear any persons of their own choosing. Those routine procedures required by the college before a guest speaker is invited to appear on campus are designed only to ensure that there is orderly scheduling of facilities and adequate
        preparation for the event and that the occasion is conducted in a manner appropriate to an academic community. The institutional control of campus facilities will not be used as a device for censorship. It should be made clear to the academic and larger community that sponsorship
        of guest speakers does not necessarily imply approval or endorsement of the views expressed either by the sponsoring group or the institution.
    3. Student Participation in Institutional Government
      As constituents of the academic community, students have the right, individually and collectively, to express their views on issues of institutional policy and on matters of general interest to the student body. The student body has the right to clearly defined means to participate in the formulation and application of institutional policy affecting academic and student affairs. The actions of the student government within the areas of its jurisdiction will be reviewed only through orderly and prescribed procedures.
    4. Student Communications Media
      Student publications, the student press and student non-print media are valuable aids in establishing and maintaining an atmosphere of free and responsible discussion and of intellectual exploration on the campus. They are a means of bringing student concerns to the attention of the faculty and the institutional officers and of formulating student opinion on various issues on the campus and in the world at large. Involvement with any of the communications media affords students valuable out-of-classroom, educational experiences, which sharpen intellectual skills and enhance personal growth.
      Institutional authorities, in consultation with students and faculty, have a responsibility to provide written clarification of the role of the student publications, the standards to be used in their evaluations and the limitations on external control of their operation. At the same time, the editorial freedom of student editors and managers entails corollary responsibilities to be governed by the canons of responsible journalism, such as the avoidance of libel, indecency, undocumented allegations, attacks on personal integrity and the techniques of harassment and innuendo.
      In the delegation of editorial responsibility to students, the institution will provide sufficient editorial freedom and financial autonomy for student communications media to maintain their integrity of purpose as vehicles for free inquiry and free expression in an academic community. As safeguards for the editorial freedom of these media, and in recognition of the responsibilities which necessarily accompany editorial freedom, a student communications board has been established to:
      1. ensure the maintenance of high procedural and ethical standards of communications media;
      2. preserve the autonomy of student media from external censorship or control;
      3. provide a vehicle for the constructive resolution of conflicts which may arise concerning student media.
        The student communications board shall serve to protect the constitutionally-guaranteed rights of all communications media as well as to ensure that these rights are exercised responsibly in accordance with the following provisions:
        1. Student communications media operations shall be subject to all approved standards and procedures set forth by the student communications board.
        2. Student communications media shall be free from all forms of censorship including requirements for advance administrative approval of copy; arbitrary selection or removal of editors or managers because of editorial policy or content; and attempts at control through allocation of the student activities fee.
        3. The First Amendment and all elements of due process must be observed when adjudging student performance. Only under special circumstances related to the maintenance of order and discipline within the institution may editors and managers be subject to removal and then only by orderly and prescribed procedures. The student communications board, as the agency responsible for the appointment of editors and managers, will be the agency responsible for any actions taken concerning the matter.
        4. Student editors and managers, by their voluntary participation in student communications media, must assume obligations of performance and behavior reasonably imposed by the institution relevant to its lawful mission, process and functions.
  4. OFF-CAMPUS FREEDOM OF STUDENTS
    1. Exercise of Rights of Citizenship
      Anne Arundel Community College students are both citizens and members of the academic community. As citizens, students should enjoy the same freedom of speech, peaceful assembly and right of petition that other citizens enjoy and, as members of the academic community, they are subject to the obligations which accrue to them by virtue of this membership. Faculty members and administrative officials should at all times encourage such intellectual and personal development of students as is often promoted by the exercise of the rights of citizenship both on- and off-campus.
    2. Institutional Authority and Civil Penalties
      Activities of students may upon occasion result in violation of law. Whenever it is appropriate, institutional officials will inform students of sources of legal counsel and may offer other assistance. However, the campus is not a sanctuary from general law. Students who violate the law may incur penalties prescribed by civil authorities, but institutional authority should never be used merely to duplicate the function of general laws. Only where the institution’s interests as an academic community are distinct and clearly involved should the special authority of the institution be asserted. The student who incidentally violates institutional regulations in the course of his off-campus activity, such as those relating to class attendance, should be subject to no greater penalty than would normally be imposed. Institutional action should be independent of community pressure.

Tobacco and Tobacco Substitutes Use and Promotion on College Property

No person shall use tobacco, tobacco product(s), and/or tobacco substitute(s)  on any property owned, operated, leased, or managed by Anne Arundel Community College, including, but not limited to, buildings, parking lots, college-owned vehicles, fields/lawns, and venues rented or controlled for college-sponsored activities. This policy further prohibits the promotion, marketing, advertising, sampling, distribution, or sale of the tobacco products and substitutes listed below by any person or company on any of the college properties described above.

This policy applies to all forms of tobacco, tobacco products, tobacco substitutes, and tobacco delivery devices. Prohibited products and devices include all tobacco-derived or containing products or substitutes, including, but not limited to, the following:

  1. cigarettes, cigars, cigarillos, pipes, chewing tobacco, snuff, snus, dissolvable tobacco, other smokeless tobacco;
  2. e-cigarettes, electronic nicotine delivery systems, hookahs, and other devices whose products are inhaled and/or which produce a vapor;
  3. any tobacco-, nicotine-, or smoking-related product which has an actual or potential effect upon a non-user;
  4. any tobacco-, nicotine-, or smoking-related product existing at this time this policy is adopted; and
  5. any tobacco-, nicotine-, or smoking-related product which may be developed in the future.

Smoking/tobacco cessation products such as nicotine patches, gum, and similar products or physician-prescribed medications are not restricted by this policy.

The Board of Trustees hereby authorizes the president, or his/her designee, to develop and establish appropriate procedure to implement and enforce this policy and to develop, implement, maintain, and keep current an educational, informational, and compliance program consistent with this policy.

Traffic and Parking Regulations

21-101.1(2) Maryland Vehicle Law

Notwithstanding other provisions of the Anne Arundel Community College Traffic and Parking Regulations, all of the provisions of the Maryland Vehicle Law relating to traffic upon the highways shall be applicable to the traffic upon the roadways, driveways, paths, parking facilities and grounds of the Community College.

Authorization to Enforce

Members of the Anne Arundel Community College Department of Public Safety shall be authorized to enforce the traffic and parking regulations of the College for which an enforcement action exist.

General Information

These regulations have been established to protect the safety of faculty, staff, students and visitors and to control motor vehicle traffic and parking on campus so that the college business may be conducted in an orderly manner. Parking or driving a motor vehicle on campus is a privilege and constitutes acceptance by the owner and/or operator of the responsibility to see that his/her vehicle is neither operated nor parked in violation of these regulations or any state regulations/laws.

General Regulations

College parking and traffic restrictions are indicated by these printed regulations and/or signs, street markings or curb markings.

It is the responsibility of all faculty, staff and students operating a motor vehicle on campus to learn and obey these parking and traffic regulations. Ignorance of the provisions of these regulations will not be accepted as a defense for violations. Direct specific questions relating to these regulations to the Department of Public Safety.

In addition to the college’s parking and traffic regulations, county ordinances and state laws relating to motor vehicles also are enforced on campus.

Vehicle Registration

Parking Regulations

  • Vehicles may be parked only in clearly designated lined legal parking spaces.
  • Student parking is permitted during weekday business hours in any space in lots A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H, I and the C lot overflow, excluding the following areas:

Those areas posted or marked by yellow curbs as reserved for the physically disabled, loading zones, visitors and motorcycle parking.
Those areas posted as reserved for faculty/staff or reserved (numbered spaces).
Areas marked by cones or other temporary markings as being reserved.

Handicap Parking

It is against college policy and the Maryland Vehicle Law for anyone to use a “Handicap Placard” or registration plates that are issued to another person. Family members are not allowed to use a placard issued to someone else in the family without that person being in the vehicle.

The number of parking spaces for the physically disabled on campus is limited. Do not use a parking space for the physically disabled unless you have a placard issued in your name. The Motor Vehicle Administration law requires that all persons having a placard display it on the rear view mirror and carry with them the application for the permit. The law and college policy gives a police officer or any other person authorized by a political subdivision to enforce this. If the person asked cannot produce the application or the application is in someone else’s name, the officer will advise the person to move their vehicle from the space reserved for the physically disabled. Any person who violates the provisions of this law is guilty of a misdemeanor and subject to a fine.

The Department of Public Safety requests that all students and staff who have been issued a handicap placard or a disability license plate from the Motor Vehicle Administration visit the Department of Public Safety to have their permit verified.

The office is located in the Central Services Building located at the second entrance to the college of College Parkway next to the barn. The office is open from 7 a.m. to 11 p.m. seven days a week.

Special college permits can be obtained on a temporary basis through the Department of Public Safety to faculty, staff and students with physical disabilities who lack state-issued license plates or hang tags. A physician’s written statement is required.

No Parking Area

Parking is prohibited at intersections, crosswalks, sidewalks, posted bus zones, posted no parking zones, fire lanes, fire hydrants, areas not designated as a parking space and all areas marked by yellow or red curbs.

Towing

The college reserves the right to remove any vehicle found on campus which is parked in a driveway or fire lane, blocking a loading dock or trash dumpster, or illegally parked in such a way as to constitute a hazard to vehicular and pedestrian traffic or to the movement or operation of emergency equipment. The owner will be responsible for the costs involved in removing and storing such a vehicle. The college is not responsible for any damage to a vehicle resulting from towing the vehicle.

Banning

Flagrant violations of parking and traffic regulations may result in the loss of the privilege to operate or park a motor vehicle on the campus.

Utilization of Student Work

When taking classes at Anne Arundel Community College, students produce a variety of academic work such as writing assignments, reports, projects, presentations and portfolios. All academic work is treated with respect and privacy. The College recognizes the importance of protecting access to such work by those not entitled to observe it. The College, however, may share students’ work within the AACC academic community, without identifying the producer, for the sole purposes of assessing student learning as a group; students’ work samples, if submitted for assessment, will not include any type of personal identification such as a student’s name, social security number, or other identifying medium. Aggregate student assessment findings/conclusions, such as the results for a specific course, degree or certificate program, without any student identifying information, may be shared with agencies that require AACC to report on student learning.

Waivers to Tuition Policy

In compliance with the Code of Maryland Regulations and the Education Article of the Maryland Annotated Code, the Board of Trustees of Anne Arundel Community College authorizes partial or full waivers of tuition for qualifying students in the categories listed below:

  • Maryland residents who are age 60 years and older;
  • Maryland residents who are certified as out of the workforce by reason of total and permanent disability;
  • Full-time faculty and staff of Anne Arundel Community College and their dependents;
  • Part-time faculty of Anne Arundel Community College;
  • Regular part-time staff of Anne Arundel Community College and their dependents;
  • Dual-enrolled high school students;
  • Members of the Maryland National Guard;
  • Maryland foster care recipients;
  • Undocumented immigrant individuals who meet the criteria set forth in state law.

The college may set the conditions under which individuals may enroll without payment of tuition. To qualify for a partial or full waiver, individuals must provide documentation and satisfy any conditions as described in state law and college procedures.

The Board of Trustees hereby authorizes the President, or his/her designee, to develop and establish appropriate procedures to implement this policy.

Weapons Policy

No student, faculty, staff or visitor shall possess, keep, use, display or transport any weapon whatsoever, including but not limited to a rifle, shotgun, handgun, pellet or BB gun, stun gun, taser gun, knife, sword, billy club, makeshift or facsimile weapon, explosive, martial arts weapon, e.g. nanchuku, or any other instrument capable of inflicting physical harm, by any means, on any property or in any building owned, leased or used by the college or in any vehicle on college property. Instruments required for use in college-sponsored activities, courses, or employment, in accordance with approved procedural guidelines, are excluded from this policy. The President, or his/her designee, shall compile, maintain, and keep current an inventory of such college-authorized usages.

This policy shall not apply to any federal, state or local law enforcement officer or college public safety officer authorized to wear, carry, or transport a weapon on college property.

The Board of Trustees hereby authorizes the President, or his/her designee, to develop and establish appropriate procedures to implement and enforce this policy.

Title 13B - Maryland Higher Education Commission

Subtitle 06 - General Education and Transfer

Chapter 01 - Public Institutions of Higher Education

Authority: Education Article, §§ 11-201-11-206 Annotated Code of Maryland

.01 Scope and Applicability.

This chapter applies only to public institutions of higher education.

.02 Definitions.

  1. In this chapter, the following terms have the meanings indicated.
  2. Terms Defined.
    1. “A.A. degree” means the Associate of Arts degree.
    2. “A.A.S. degree” means the Associate of Applied Science degree.
    3. “Arts” means courses that examine aesthetics and the development of the aesthetic form and explore the relationship between theory and practice. Courses in this area may include fine arts, performing and studio arts, appreciation of the arts, and history of the arts.
    4. “A.S. degree” means the Associate of Sciences degree.
    5. “Biological and physical sciences” means courses that examine living systems and the physical universe. They introduce students to the variety of methods used to collect, interpret, and apply scientific data, and to an understanding of the relationship between scientific theory and application.
    6. “English composition courses” means courses that provide students with communication knowledge and skills appropriate to various writing situations, including intellectual inquiry and academic research.
    7. “General education” means the foundation of the higher education curriculum providing a coherent intellectual experience for all students.
    8. “General education program” means a program that is designed to:
      1. Introduce undergraduates to the fundamental knowledge, skills, and values that are essential to the study of academic disciplines;
      2. Encourage the pursuit of life-long learning; and
      3. Foster the development of educated members of the community and the world.
    9. “Humanities” means courses that examine the values and cultural heritage that establish the framework for inquiry into the meaning of life. Courses in the humanities may include the language, history, literature, and philosophy of Western and other cultures.
    10. “Mathematics” means courses that provide students with numerical, analytical, statistical, and problem-solving skills.
    11. “Native student” means a student whose initial college enrollment was at a given institution of higher education and who has not transferred to another institution of higher education since that initial enrollment.
    12. “Parallel program” means the program of study or courses at one institution of higher education which has comparable objectives as those at another higher education institution, for example, a transfer program in psychology in a community college is definable as a parallel program to a baccalaureate psychology program at a 4-year institution of higher education.
    13. “Receiving institution” means the institution of higher education at which a transfer student currently desires to enroll.
    14. “Recommended transfer program” means a planned program of courses, both general education and courses in the major, taken at a community college, which is applicable to a baccalaureate program at a receiving institution, and ordinarily the first 2 years of the baccalaureate degree.
    15. “Sending institution” means the institution of higher education of most recent previous enrollment by a transfer student at which transferable academic credit was earned.
    16. “Social and behavioral sciences” means courses that examine the psychology of individuals and the ways in which individuals, groups, or segments of society behave, function, and influence one another. The courses include, but are not limited to, subjects which focus on:
      1. History and cultural diversity;
      2. Concepts of groups, work, and political systems;
      3. Applications of qualitative and quantitative data to social issues; and
      4. Interdependence of individuals, society, and the physical environment.
    17. “Transfer student” means a student entering an institution for the first time having successfully completed a minimum of 12 semester hours at another institution which is applicable for credit at the institution the student is entering.

.02-1 Admission of Transfer Students to Public Institutions.

  1. Admission to Institutions.
    1. A student attending a public institution who has completed an A.A., A.A.S., or A.S. degree or who has completed 56 or more semester hours of credit, shall not be denied direct transfer to another public institution if the student attained a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.0 on a 4.0 scale or its equivalent in parallel courses, except as provided in subsection (4) below.
    2. A student attending a public institution who has not completed an A.A., A.A.S., or A.S. degree or who has completed fewer than 56 semester hours of credit, shall be eligible to transfer to a public institution regardless of the number of credit hours earned if the student:
      1. Satisfied the admission criteria of that receiving public institution as a high school senior; and
      2. Attained at least a cumulative grade point average of 2.0 on a 4.0 scale or its equivalent in parallel courses.
    3. A student attending a public institution who did not satisfy the admission criteria of a receiving public institution as a high school senior, but who has earned sufficient credits at a public institution to be classified by the receiving public institution as a sophomore, shall meet the stated admission criteria developed and published by the receiving public institution for transfer.
    4. If the number of students seeking admission exceeds the number that can be accommodated at a receiving public institution, admission decisions shall be:
      1. Based on criteria developed and published by the receiving public institution; and
      2. Made to provide fair and equal treatment for native and transfer students.
  2. Admission to Programs.
    1. A receiving public institution may require higher performance standards for admission to some programs if the standards and criteria for admission to the program:
      1. Are developed and published by the receiving public institution; and
      2. Maintain fair and equal treatment for native and transfer students.
    2. If the number of students seeking admission exceeds the number that can be accommodated in a particular professional or specialized program, admission decisions shall be:
      1. Based on criteria developed and published by the receiving public institution; and
      2. Made to provide fair and equal treatment for native and transfer students.
    3. Courses taken at a public institution as part of a recommended transfer program leading toward a baccalaureate degree shall be applicable to related programs at a receiving public institution granting the baccalaureate degree.
  3. Receiving Institution Program Responsibility.
    1. The faculty of a receiving public institution shall be responsible for development and determination of the program requirements in major fields of study for a baccalaureate degree, including courses in the major field of study taken in the lower division.
    2. A receiving public institution may set program requirements in major fields of study which simultaneously fulfill general education requirements.
    3. A receiving public institution, in developing lower division course work, shall exchange information with other public institutions to facilitate the transfer of credits into its programs.

.03 General Education Requirements for Public Institutions.

  1. While public institutions have the autonomy to design their general education program to meet their unique needs and mission, that program shall conform to the definitions and common standards in this chapter. A public institution shall satisfy the general education requirement by:
    1. Requiring each program leading to the A.A. or A.S. degree to include not less than 30 and not more than 36 semester hours, and each baccalaureate degree program to include not less than 40 and not more than 46 semester hours of required core courses, with the core requiring, at a minimum, course work in each of the following five areas:
      1. Arts and humanities,
      2. Social and behavioral sciences,
      3. Biological and physical sciences,
      4. Mathematics, and
      5. English composition; or
    2. Conforming with COMAR 13B.02.02.16D(2)(b)-(c).
  2. Each core course used to satisfy the distribution requirements of §A(1) of this regulation shall carry at least 3 semester hours.
  3. General education programs of public institutions shall require at least.
    1. One course in each of two disciplines in arts and humanities;
    2. One course in each of two disciplines in social and behavioral sciences;
    3. Two science courses, at least one of which shall be a laboratory course;
    4. One course in mathematics at or above the level of college algebra; and
    5. One course in English composition.
  4. Interdisciplinary and Emerging Issues.
    1. In addition to the five required areas in §A of this regulation, a public institution may include up to 8 semester hours in a sixth category that addresses emerging issues that institutions have identified as essential to a full program of general education for their students. These
      courses may:
      1. Be integrated into other general education courses or may be presented as separate courses; and
      2. Include courses that:
        1. Provide an interdisciplinary examination of issues across the five areas, or
        2. Address other categories of knowledge, skills, and values that lie outside of the five areas.
    2. Public institutions may not include the courses in this section in a general education program unless they provide academic content and rigor equivalent to the areas in §A(1) of this regulation.
  5. General education programs leading to the A.A.S. degree shall include at least 20 semester hours from the same course list designated by the sending institution for the A.A. and A.S. degrees. The A.A.S. degree shall include at least one 3-semester-hour course from each of the five areas listed in §(A)(1) of this regulation.
  6. A course in a discipline listed in more than one of the areas of general education may be applied only to one area of general education.
  7. A public institution may allow a speech communication or foreign language course to be part of the arts and humanities category.
  8. Composition and literature courses may be placed in the arts and humanities area if literature is included as part of the content of the course.
  9. Public institutions may not include physical education skills courses as part of the general education requirements.
  10. General education courses shall reflect current scholarship in the discipline and provide reference to theoretical frameworks and methods of inquiry appropriate to academic disciplines.
  11. Courses that are theoretical may include applications, but all applications courses shall include theoretical components if they are to be included as meeting general education requirements.
  12. Public institutions may incorporate knowledge and skills involving the use of quantitative data, effective writing, information retrieval, and information literacy when possible in the general education program.
  13. Notwithstanding §A(1) of this regulation, a public 4-year institution may require 48 semester hours of required core courses if courses upon which the institution’s curriculum is based carry 4 semester hours.
  14. Public institutions shall develop systems to ensure that courses approved for inclusion on the list of general education courses are designed and assessed to comply with the requirements of this chapter.

.04 Transfer of General Education Credit.

  1. A student transferring to one public institution from another public institution shall receive general education credit for work completed at the student’s sending institution as provided by this chapter.
  2. A completed general education program shall transfer without further review or approval by the receiving institution and without the need for a course-by-course match.
  3. Courses that are defined as general education by one institution shall transfer as general education even if the receiving institution does not have that specific course or has not designated that course as general education.
  4. The receiving institution shall give lower-division general education credits to a transferring student who has taken any part of the lower-division general education credits described in Regulation .03 of this chapter at a public institution for any general education courses successfully completed at the sending institution.
  5. Except as provided in Regulation .03M of this chapter, a receiving institution may not require a transfer student who has completed the requisite number of general education credits at any public college or university to take, as a condition of graduation, more than 10-16 additional semester hours of general education and specific courses required of all students at the receiving institution, with the total number not to exceed 46 semester hours. This provision does not relieve students of the obligation to complete specific academic program requirements or course prerequisites required by a receiving institution.
  6. A sending institution shall designate on or with the student transcript those courses that have met its general education requirements, as well as indicate whether the student has completed the general education program.
  7. A.A.S. Degrees.
    1. While there may be variance in the numbers of hours of general education required for A.A., A.S., and A.A.S. degrees at a given institution, the courses identified as meeting general education requirements for all degrees shall come from the same general education course list and exclude technical or career courses.
    2. An A.A.S. student who transfers into a receiving institution with fewer than the total number of general education credits designated by the receiving institution shall complete the difference in credits according to the distribution as designated by the receiving institution. Except as provided in Regulation .03M of this chapter, the total general education credits for baccalaureate degree-granting public receiving institutions may not exceed 46 semester hours.
  8. Student Responsibilities. A student is held:
    1. Accountable for the loss of credits that:
      1. Result from changes in the student’s selection of the major program of study,
      2. Were earned for remedial course work, or
      3. Exceed the total course credits accepted in transfer as allowed by this chapter; and
      4. Responsible for meeting all requirements of the academic program of the receiving institution.

.05 Transfer of Nongeneral Education Program Credit.

  1. Transfer to Another Public Institution.
    1. Credit earned at any public institution in the State is transferable to any other public institution if the:
      1. Credit is from a college or university parallel course or program;
      2. Grades in the block of courses transferred average 2.0 or higher; and
      3. Acceptance of the credit is consistent with the policies of the receiving institution governing native students following the same program.
    2. If a native student’s “D” grade in a specific course is acceptable in a program, then a “D” earned by a transfer student in the same course at a sending institution is also acceptable in the program. Conversely, if a native student is required to earn a grade of “C” or better in a required course, the transfer student shall also be required to earn a grade of “C” or better to meet the same requirement.
  2. Credit earned in or transferred from a community college is limited to:
    1. 1/2 the baccalaureate degree program requirement, but may not be more than 70 semester hours; and
    2. The first 2 years of the undergraduate education experience.
  3. Nontraditional Credit.
    1. The assignment of credit for AP, CLEP, or other nationally recognized standardized examination scores presented by transfer students is determined according to the same standards that apply to native students in the receiving institution, and the assignment shall be consistent with
      the State minimum requirements.
    2. Transfer of credit from the following areas shall be consistent with COMAR 13B.02.02. and shall be evaluated by the receiving institution on a course-by-course basis:
      1. Technical courses from career programs;
      2. Course credit awarded through articulation agreements with other segments or agencies;
      3. Credit awarded for clinical practice or cooperative education experiences; and
      4. Credit awarded for life and work experiences.
    3. The basis for the awarding of the credit shall be indicated on the student’s transcript by the receiving institution.
    4. The receiving institution shall inform a transfer student of the procedures for validation of course work for which there is no clear equivalency. Examples of validation procedures include ACE recommendations, portfolio assessment, credit through challenge, examinations, and satisfactory
      completion of the next course in sequence in the academic area.
    5. The receiving baccalaureate degree-granting institution shall use validation procedures when a transferring student successfully completes a course at the lower division level that the receiving institution offers at the upper division level. The validated credits earned for the course shall
      be substituted for the upper division course.
  4. Program Articulation.
    1. Recommended transfer programs shall be developed through consultation between the sending and receiving institutions. A recommended transfer program represents an agreement between the two institutions that allows students aspiring to the baccalaureate degree to plan their programs. These programs constitute freshman/sophomore level course work to be taken at the community college in fulfillment of the receiving institution’s lower division course work requirement.
    2. Recommended transfer programs in effect at the time that this regulation takes effect, which conform to this chapter, may be retained.

.06 Academic Success and General Well-Being of Transfer Students.

  1. Sending Institutions.
    1. Community colleges shall encourage their students to complete the associate degree or to complete 56 hours in a recommended transfer program which includes both general education courses and courses applicable toward the program at the receiving institution.
    2. Community college students are encouraged to choose as early as possible the institution and program into which they expect to transfer.
    3. The sending institution shall:
      1. Provide to community college students information about the specific transferability of courses at 4-year colleges;
      2. Transmit information about transfer students who are capable of honors work or independent study to the receiving institution; and
      3. Promptly supply the receiving institution with all the required documents if the student has met all financial and other obligations of the sending institution for transfer.
  2. Receiving Institutions.
    1. Admission requirements and curriculum prerequisites shall be stated explicitly in institutional publications.
    2. A receiving institution shall admit transfer students from newly established public colleges that are functioning with the approval of the Maryland Higher Education Commission on the same basis as applicants from regionally accredited colleges.
    3. A receiving institution shall evaluate the transcript of a degree-seeking transfer student as expeditiously as possible, and notify the student of the results not later than mid-semester of the student’s first semester of enrollment at the receiving institution, if all official transcripts have been received at least 15 working days before mid-semester. The receiving institution shall inform a student of the courses which are acceptable for transfer credit and the courses which are applicable to the student’s intended program of study.
    4. A receiving institution shall give a transfer student the option of satisfying institutional graduation requirements that were in effect at the receiving institution at the time the student enrolled as a freshman at the sending institution. In the case of major requirements, a transfer student may satisfy the major requirements in effect at the time when the student was identifiable as pursuing the recommended transfer program at the sending institution. These conditions are applicable to a student who has been continuously enrolled at the sending institution.

.07 Programmatic Currency.

  1. A receiving institution shall provide to the community college current and accurate information on recommended transfer programs and the transferability status of courses. Community college students shall have access to this information.
  2. Recommended transfer programs shall be developed with each community college whenever new baccalaureate programs are approved by the degree-granting institution.
  3. When considering curricular changes, institutions shall notify each other of the proposed changes that might affect transfer students. An appropriate mechanism shall be created to ensure that both 2-year and 4-year public colleges provide input or comments to the institution proposing the change. Sufficient lead time shall be provided to effect the change with minimum disruption. Transfer students are not required to repeat equivalent course work successfully completed at a community college.

.08 Transfer Mediation Committee.

  1. There is a Transfer Mediation Committee, appointed by the Secretary, which is representative of the public 4-year colleges and universities and the community colleges.
  2. Sending and receiving institutions that disagree on the transferability of general education courses as defined by this chapter shall submit their disagreements to the Transfer Mediation Committee. The Transfer Mediation Committee shall address general questions regarding existing or past courses only, not individual student cases, and shall also address questions raised by institutions about the acceptability of new general education courses. As appropriate, the Committee shall consult with faculty on curricular issues.
  3. The findings of the Transfer Mediation Committee are considered binding on both parties.

.09 Appeal Process.

  1. Notice of Denial of Transfer Credit by a Receiving Institution.
    1. Except as provided in §A(2) of this regulation, a receiving institution shall inform a transfer student in writing of the denial of transfer credit not later than mid-semester of the transfer student’s first semester, if all official transcripts have been received at least 15 working days before mid-semester.
    2. If transcripts are submitted after 15 working days before mid-semester of a student’s first semester, the receiving institution shall inform the student of credit denied within 20 working days of receipt of the official transcript.
    3. A receiving institution shall include in the notice of denial of transfer credit:
      1. A statement of the student’s right to appeal; and
      2. A notification that the appeal process is available in the institution’s catalog.
    4. The statement of the student’s right to appeal the denial shall include notice of the time limitations in §B of this regulation.
  2. A student believing that the receiving institution has denied the student transfer credits in violation of this chapter may initiate an appeal by contacting the receiving institution’s transfer coordinator or other responsible official of the receiving institution within 20 working days of receiving notice of the denial of credit.
  3. Response by Receiving Institution.
    1. A receiving institution shall:
      1. Establish expeditious and simplified procedures governing the appeal of a denial of transfer of credit; and
      2. Respond to a student’s appeal within 10 working days.
    2. An institution may either grant or deny an appeal. The institution’s reasons for denying the appeal shall be consistent with this chapter and conveyed to the student in written form.
    3. Unless a student appeals to the sending institution, the writing decision in §C(2) of this regulation constitutes the receiving institution’s final decision and is not subject to appeal.
  4. Appeal to Sending Institution.
    1. If a student has been denied transfer credit after an appeal to the receiving institution, the student may request the sending institution to intercede on the student’s behalf by contacting the transfer coordinator of the sending institution.
    2. A student shall make an appeal to the sending institution within 10 working days of having received the decision of the receiving institution.
  5. Consultation Between Sending and Receiving Institutions.
    1. Representatives of the two institutions shall have 15 working days to resolve the issues involved in an appeal.
    2. As a result of a consultation in this section, the receiving institution may affirm, modify, or reverse its earlier decision.
    3. The receiving institution shall inform a student in writing of the result of the consultation.
    4. The decision arising out of a consultation constitutes the final decision of the receiving institution and is not subject to appeal.

.10 Periodic Review.

  1. Report by Receiving Institution.
    1. A receiving institution shall report annually the progress of students who transfer from 2-year and 4-year institutions within the State to each community college and to the Secretary of the Maryland Higher Education Commission.
    2. An annual report shall include ongoing reports on the subsequent academic success of enrolled transfer students, including graduation rates, by major subject areas.
    3. A receiving institution shall include in the reports comparable information on the progress of native students.
  2. Transfer Coordinator. A public institution of higher education shall designate a transfer coordinator, who serves as a resource person to transfer students at either the sending or receiving campus. The transfer coordinator is responsible for overseeing the application of the policies and procedures outlined in this chapter and interpreting transfer policies to the individual student and to the institution.
  3. The Maryland Higher Education Commission shall establish a permanent Student Transfer Advisory Committee that meets regularly to review transfer issues and recommend policy changes as needed. The Student Transfer Advisory Committee shall address issues of interpretation and implementation of this chapter.

Administrative History

Effective date: December 4, 1995 (22:24 Md. R. 1901)
Regulations .02, .03, and .05 amended. Effective date: July 1, 1996 (23:13 Md. R. 946) Revised: February 11, 1998

Note: A semester is equivalent to a term at Anne Arundel Community College.