Apr 16, 2024  
2016-2017 Catalog 
    
2016-2017 Catalog [PAST CATALOG]

LGS 218 - Introduction to Immigration Law

3 credit hours - Three hours weekly; one term.
Learn the history of immigration and the laws, policies, and regulations regarding citizenship. Study various visa petitions including, but not limited to, non-immigrant visas, family-based immigration, employment-based immigration, asylum/refugee applications and deportation and adoption issues. Discuss the appellate process and post 9/11 issues, including the creation of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS). Lab fee $5.

Prerequisite(s): Eligibility for ENG 111  or ENG 115  or ENG 121 .

Note: This course is not considered a legal specialty course for the purpose of earning legal specialty credits in the Paralegal Studies program. However, it may be applied as a general elective in the Paralegal Studies degree program as noted in the program description. Please see an adviser before registering for this course.

Course Outcomes
Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  • Demonstrate understanding of the history of US immigration, USCIS, and the development of the Department of Homeland Security.
    • Identify the trends in the immigration process such as country specific quotas and be able to explain why such limitations are utilized and whether they are effective.
    • Identify the steps, via the immigration process, that have been taken to control the threats to our national security, including border patrol, and mandatory finger printing.
    • Be able to express orally and in writing the learning objectives through class discussions and written essay questions, including thought questions e.g. Is the USCIS a necessary division of the Department of Homeland Security?
  • Demonstrate knowledge of events and/or issues and their impact on immigration. Examples: 9/11, World War I and II, and International Gangs. Evaluate the events and/or issues in light of current world climate.
    • Be able to describe important events/issues of US immigration in relation to world events.
    • Be able to express orally and in writing the learning objectives through class discussions and written essay questions, including thought questions e.g. Discuss the Central American gang issue, youth offenders/survivors and the problem it poses for asylum cases.
    • Identify and graph relevant research pertaining to specific country conditions.
  • Develop an understanding of the cultural and social times in the USA e.g. Patriot Act, illegal immigrants/undocumented workers, and healthcare debate.
    • Be able to understand the effect of cultural attitudes such as the anti-immigration movement on immigration policies e.g. The effect of hiring legal permanent residents for specialized fields/employment.
  • Evaluate and assess the impact of the cultural and social times in USA and the world, on the immigration and naturalization process.
    • Be able to discuss intelligently contemporary international challenges in the context of policies and events, such as Iraq, Afghanistan, and Darfur.
    • Be able to understand the effect that deportation/removal may have on families within the USA.
    • Be able to express orally and in writing the learning objectives through class discussions and written essay questions, including thought questions e.g. Should a legal permanent resident who has lived in the USA for nearly their entire life be deported/removed for a crime of moral turpitude
  • Develop understanding and demonstrate knowledge of the various immigrant and nonimmigrant visas.
    • Be able to identify the proper visa for various clients and discuss the reasoning for such selection.
    • Develop understanding between nonimmigrant visa and immigrant visa and the necessary evidence to support each case/application.
    • Develop understanding for the cultural differences when ascertaining the validity and/or availability of evidence, such as whether an individual may waive the meeting requirement required for issuance of a K1 Fiance Visa, when there is a religious or cultural restriction.
    • Be able to properly complete immigration forms electronically using the USCIS database.
    • Be able to express orally and in writing the learning objectives through class discussions and written essay questions, including thought questions e.g. Should a Revocable Divorce granted by a Moroccan court be considered a divorce Nisi or Final divorce when determining whether an individual is eligible to marry?
Core Competencies
Core 1 Communication Core 3 Information Literacy Core 5 Self Management Core 6 Scientific Reasoning Core 8 Social and Civic Responsibility Core 9 Global Perspective Core 10 Innovative and Critical Thinking