Sep 23, 2020  
2016-2017 Catalog 
    
2016-2017 Catalog [PAST CATALOG]

CHE 112H - General Chemistry 2 - Honors

4 credit hours - Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory weekly; one term.
This is an honors course.

This course meets the Biological and Physical Sciences General Education Requirement.

Examine kinetics; gaseous and aqueous equilibria - including acids, bases, solubility and complex ions; thermodynamics; electrochemistry; and nuclear chemistry. Study introductory organic chemistry and consider aspects of environmental chemistry. Laboratory work includes qualitative analysis and quantitative measurements. Lab fee $40.

Prerequisite(s): Eligibility for Honors courses and  CHE 111  with a grade of C or better and either MAT 141  (formerly MAT 131) with a grade of C or better or eligibility for MAT 151 .

Crosslisted: Also offered as CHE 112 ; credit is not given for both CHE 112H and CHE 112 .

Course Outcomes
Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:
 

  • Deduce and interpret rate laws using the concepts of chemical kinetics.
    • Express reaction rates; relate rate with respect to a given substance to rate with respect to any other substance in the reaction.
    • Calculate average rates and instantaneous rates.
    • Determine the rate law for a reaction from initial rate studies (i.e., rate vs. concentration).
    • Determine order of reaction using the integrated rate equations for zero, first, and second order.
    • Use the integrated rate equations (for zero, first, & second order) to calculate rate constants, and concentration–time relationships.
    • Calculate the rate constant, given the half-life (for first & second order processes) and vice versa.
    • Develop the relevant chemical kinetics vocabulary.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the Collision Model and the Arrhenius Equation.
    • Explain the the theoretical basis for the Arrhenius Equation in terms of collision frequency, effective collisions, activation energy, and transition states.
    • Calculate activation energy using the Arrhenius Equation.
    • Calculate rate constant – temperature relationships using the Arrhenius Equation.
    • Explain catalysis and relate it to activation energy.
  • Interpret reaction mechanisms.
    • Analyze reaction mechanisms for consistency with a given rate law.
    • Explain reaction mechanisms using the concepts of rate determining, molecularity, intermediates, and boundaries (heterogeneous reactions).
  • Deduce equilibrium constant expressions.
    • Explain the concept of equilibrium in terms of distribution of amounts of products and reactants.
    • Explain dynamic equilibrium.
    • Write equilibrium constant expressions for both homogeneous and heterogeneous equilibria.
    • Interrelate values of equilibrium constants, K, for a reaction written in different ways.
    • Relate Kc to Kp.
    • Calculate K for a reaction given equilibrium concentrations.
    • Develop the relevant chemical equilibrium vocabulary.
  • Use equilibrium constants to calculate concentrations and to predict extent of reaction.
    • Use the value of K to determine whether the formation of products or reactants is favored.
    • Calculate reaction quotient Q, and use Q value to decide the direction in which the reaction will proceed.
    • Calculate equilibrium concentration of a species, given K and equilibrium concentrations of other reaction species.
    • Calculate equilibrium concentrations of all reaction species given K and initial concentrations (& variations), provided equilibrium expression’s algebraic order is less than or equal to 2.
    • Find cases which reduce to simple algebra, or which justify using simplifying approximation (in d above).
  • Explain factors affecting equilibria.
    • Explain and apply LeChatelier’s Principle.
    • Explain the effect on the equilibrium system of changing concentration, pressure, volume, or temperature.
    • Explain why a catalyst does not affect the equilibrium constant.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the nature of acids and bases.
    • Explain the Arrhenius, Bronsted-Lowry, and Lewis models for acids and bases.
    • Explain the concepts of autoionization of water and amphoterism.
    • Relate the concepts of acidic, basic, and neutral to concentrations of hydrogen and hydroxide ions.
    • Determine pH given hydrogen ion concentration or hydroxide concentration, or vice versa.
    • Relate pH , pOH, and pKw.
    • Write dissociation reactions for weak acids and weak bases, and explain the concept of acid (or base) strength.
    • Explain the concept of conjugate acid–base pairs, and describe the relation of strength of members of a pair.
    • List the names and formulas of the strong acids.
    • List the types of compounds which are strong bases.
    • Explain the relation of structure to acid/base behavior using concepts of 1) bond polarity, 2) bond strength, 3) resonance stability, 4) electronegativity, 5) oxidation numbers.
    • Develop the relevant vocabulary of acid–base chemistry.
  • Use acid and base dissociation constants to calculate concentrations and other relevant factors.
    • Write equilibrium expressions for weak acids and weak bases.
    • Relate Ka and pKa.
    • Calculate equilibrium concentrations (& pH & pOH) for weak acids and weak bases, given K and initial concentration.
    • Calculate % dissociation.
    • Find cases which justify using simplifying approximations (in objective c).
    • Describe and explain the trend in subsequent Ka values for a polyprotic acid. Give the criterion for determining pH by considering on the first Ka.
    • Explain the concept of multiple equilibria.
    • Interrelate Ka, Kb, Kw, pKa, pKb, & pKw appropriately.
  • Categorize the pH nature of salt solutions.
    • Explain why solutions of transition metal ions tend to be acidic.
    • Recognize the acid/base/neutral nature of given ions (in addition to transition metals).
    • Relate the natures of the cations and anions of a salt solution in order to characterize the pH nature of the solution.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the Common Ion Effect with respect to weak acids and bases.
    • Explain the Common ion Effect with respect to weak acid or weak base equilibria.
    • Calculate pH and concentration of species after a common ion is added (or generated) in a weak acid or weak base equilibrium.
    • Define buffers.
    • Describe how to prepare a buffer for a given pH; calculate pH of a given buffer using both equilibrium considerations and the Henderson-Hasselbalch Equation.
    • Calculate pH of a given buffer after acid or base is added using the two step method: 1st) stoichiometry, 2nd) relevant weak acid or weak base equilibrium.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of acid – base reactions.
    • Write equations for acid - base reactions, showing which acid – base reactions go to completion.
    • Calculate pH at any given point of a titration involving either a) strong acid & strong base, b) strong acid & weak base, c) weak acid & strong base using the two step method.
    • Explain the salient features of a titration curve.
    • Explain how indicators work and how they are chosen.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the aqueous equilibria of slightly soluble salts.
    • Explain factors affecting ionic solubility.
    • Write equilibrium expressions (Ksp) for slightly soluble ionic compounds.
    • Use Ksp to calculate concentrations of ions and to predict whether a precipitate forms.
    • Explain the effect of a common ion on the solubility of a slightly soluble ionic compound, and calculate concentrations of all ions.
  • Use Kf to calculate concentrations of species in a complex ion equilibrium.
    • Explain the concept of complex ions.
    • Write equilibrium expressions (Kf) for formation of complex ions.
    • Use Kf to calculate concentrations of reaction species.
  • Apply the concepts of multiple equilibria.
    • Explain the concept of multiple equilibria.
    • Use the concepts of multiple equilibria to determine reaction outcomes.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the classical method of qualitative analysis of inorganic ions.
    • Demonstrate an understanding of selective precipitation.
    • Explain the concept of qualitative analysis groups.
    • Describe positive tests for ions.
    • Develop the relevant qualitative analysis vocabulary.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the nature of complex ions.
    • Describe a coordination sphere using terms like central atom, ligand, coordination number, and Lewis base.
    • Describe the characteristics of a central atom which promote complex ion formation.
    • Use the rules for nomenclature.
    • Describe the geometry of a given complex ion.
    • Recognize isomerism: constitutional and stereo.
    • Describe ligand exchange rates, and distinguish inert and labile complexes.
    • Develop the relevant complex ion vocabulary.
  • Use Crystal Field Theory to explain relevant phenomena.
    • Describe the electron configurations of complex ions.
    • Classify a complex as low-spin or high-spin.
    • Explain color and magnetic properties of a complex.
    • Use the spectrochemical series to predict colors of complexes.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of entropy.
    • Explain the concept of entropy as a measure of disorder or randomness.
    • Explain the relation of probability to entropy.
    • Explain the relation of translational, vibrational, and rotational energy to entropy.
    • Define standard molar entropy.
    • Calculate entropy change for a reaction.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of free energy.
    • Explain the First and Second Laws of Thermodynamics.
    • Calculate the (Gibbs) Free Energy change for a reaction Using both the Gibbs-Helmholtz Equation and the equation based on the “state function” concept.
    • Predict spontaneity of a reaction based on the value of Delta G for a reaction.
    • Define the standard free energy change, and standard free energy change of formation.
    • Explain the relation between free energy change and work.
    • Relate reaction spontaneity to the algebraic signs of Delta H and Delta S, and to temperature.
    • Calculate the temperature at which Delta Grxn = 0 (when there is one).
    • Calculate and interpret Delta G for a reaction involving non-standard conditions.
    • Use the relation between Delta Grxn and the equilibrium constant.
    • Develop the relevant thermodynamics vocabulary.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of oxidation & reduction.
    • Explain and describe examples of oxidation & reduction.
    • Determine oxidation numbers.
    • Use oxidation numbers to analyze redox reactions.
    • Separate a reaction into its half reactions.
    • Balance redox reactions.
  • Demonstrate a fundamental understanding of electricity.
    • Interconvert electrical units: volts, amperes, Coulombs.
    • Draw and explain the operation of voltaic cells.
  • Use electrochemical principles and relationships.
    • Calculate cell voltages using Standard Reduction Potentials.
    • Demonstrate an understanding of the relation between cell voltage and spontaneity of reaction.
    • Explain periodic trends with respect to reduction potentials.
    • Determine relative strength of oxidizing agents and reducing agents using Standard Reduction Potentials.
    • Use the Nernst Equation to calculate the effect of concentration on voltage.
    • Calculate an equilibrium constant from standard cell voltage.
    • Explain the chemistry of a commercial voltaic cell.
    • Describe corrosion in terms of the electrochemical principles involved.
    • Explain corrosion-prevention techniques.
    • Draw and explain the operation of electrolytic cells.
    • Predict reaction products when a solution is electrolyzed.
    • Calculate quantities relating to electroplating.
    • Develop the relevant vocabulary.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of nuclear reactions.
    • Explain why there is natural radioactivity.
    • Describe types of radioactivity.
    • Describe transmutation.
    • Write nuclear reactions.
    • Describe guidelines which indicate nuclear stability.
    • Describe modes of detection of radiation, and unit of decay rate.
    • Rank relative penetrating power of types of radiation.
    • Describe ionizing radiation with respect to biological effects.
    • Interrelate units of radiation.
    • Develop the relevant vocabulary.
  • Deduce quantitative relationships of nuclear decay reactions.
    • Recognize that nuclear decay processes obey the first-order reaction rate law.
    • Calculate activity, ratio of nuclei, and time of decay using the first-order integrated rate equation.
    • Explain uses of nuclear decay in dating.
  • Interrelate mass and energy changes.
    • Use the Einstein Equation (E = mc^2) to convert change in mass to change in energy (& vice versa).
    • Calculate binding energies.
    • Relate binding energy to fusion and fission processes; explain these processes.
    • Describe ways of using energy liberated by nuclear reactions.
  • Recognize Structural Theory as the basis of organization of Organic Chemistry.
    • Categorize hydrocarbons as alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, cyclic alkanes, and aromatics.
    • Recognize these functional groups: alcohols, ethers, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids, esters, amines, and amides.
  • Describe hydrocarbons.
    • Describe the characteristics of each family of hydrocarbons using hybrid orbitals, geometry, electron density, and intermolecular forces.
    • Memorize and use the IUPAC system to name alkanes, alkenes, and alkynes.
    • Interconvert structural formulas and condensed formulas.
    • Define and recognize constitutional isomers and stereoisomers.
    • Determine structures of isomers for a given molecular formula.
  • Describe the environment of the earth.
    • Describe the lithosphere, hydrosphere, and atomsphere.
    • Describe the compositions of the layers of the atmosphere.
  • Describe pollution.
    • Explain what is meant by a pollutant.
    • Describe and give examples of how a given chemical can be harmless in one context, and harmful in another.
  • Solve environmental chemical problems.
    • Use the concepts of kinetics, equilibria, electromagnetic radiation and thermodynamics to approach environmental problems.
  • Demonstrate safe laboratory procedures.
    • Demonstrate an understanding of the use of safety equipment.
    • Demonstrate safe procedures.
  • Use common laboratory equipment correctly.
    • Use electronic balances.
    • Use burets.
    • Use pipets.
    • Use a Bunsen burner.
    • Use a vernier scale.
    • Use a thermometer.
    • Use a barometer.
    • Use various meters.
    • Use online data acquistion equipment.
    • Use indicator paper.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of experimental design.
    • Explore and validate some significant chemical concepts.
    • Analyze and interpret data appropriately.
    • Analyze experimental error appropriately.
    • Communicate experiments and their results in writing.
    • Design qualitative analysis experiments.
  • Perform quantitative procedures.
    • Perform a quantitative analysis.
    • Produce a standard curve for an instrument.
  • Retrieve and evaluate scientific information.
    • Retrieve information about chemicals from standard print and electronic databases (e.g., CRC, CSChemfinder).
    • Retrieve information on scientific topics from references sources.
    • Research a scientific issue.
Core Competencies
Core 1 Communication Core 2 Technology Fluency Core 3 Information Literacy Core 5 Self Management Core 6 Scientific Reasoning Core 7 Quantitative Reasoning Core 10 Innovative and Critical Thinking