Jul 14, 2024  
2023-2024 Catalog 
    
2023-2024 Catalog [PAST CATALOG]

CJS 233 - Forensic Psychology and Victimology

3 credit hours - Three hours weekly; one term.
A study of crime victims and the extent of their participation in the crime against them. Analyzes the responses to victimization from law enforcement, the courts and correctional systems. Explores the social, political, individual effects of crime; examines the long and short-term psychological and physical trauma as a result of violence.

Prerequisite(s): CJS 111 .

Note: Typically offered at MC and OL; fall and spring terms.

Course Outcomes:
 

  • Define and describe the qualifications of a victim.
    • Differentiate between legal, social and therapeutic definitions of victimization
    • Analyze the scope of relationships held by victims and their assailants
  • Identify the typical physical and psychological responses to victimization and to specific crimes.
    • Compare and contrast social, physical and psychological injuries typical of certain crimes, i.e., infanticide, serial killings, rape, terrorist attacks
    • Analyze the social, physical and psychological defenses, interventions and preventive measures taken by individuals and society
  • Describe the social, legislative and legal responses to victimization.
    • Explain how the adversarial criminal justice system impacts victim’s rights and concerns
    • Assess the value of victim’s impact statements to individual victims, the courts, juries, the defense and prosecution; and society at large
  • Analyze the use of victimology toward the collection of evidence and case preparation, prosecution, defense, and jury selection.
    • Evaluate case studies to establish common characteristics of victims.
    • Make logical predictions about crimes, and profile offenders based on a collection of victim characteristics and impact
    • Design defense and or prosecutorial strategies based on a collection of victim characteristics and impact
  • Examine the aftermath of major index crimes on individuals and communities to include murder, rape, assault, robbery, arson and terrorist attacks.
    • Analyze the National Victimization Crime Surveys
    • Compare and contrast the impact of crimes on communities in urban, rural and suburban areas, i.e., population attrition, tax base, business retention, educational expenses and success
  • Research the responses by offenders of crime and new initiatives toward restorative justice.
    • Assess the effects of victim advocacy policies and services afforded by various criminal justices agencies
    • Complete a “restorative justice” plan for a specific offender population
  • Study the geographic and economic implications of crimes and in reverse, the impact crimes have on these variables.
    • Describe the impact crimes have on communities in urban, rural and suburban areas, i.e., population attrition, tax base, business retention, educational expenses and success
    • Assess the social, economic and political conditions in various areas that increase criminal activity
    • Weigh the effectiveness of various “harm reduction” programs, i.e., methadone programs, needle and condom distribution, gun buy-back initiatives